24 januari 2016

PREDIKAN: TREDJE SÖNDAGEN FÖRE FASTETIDEN (SEPTUAGESIMA) MF

Martin Fagerudd
Nåden ger samma gåva åt alla
24.1.2016 kl. 10
Helsinge kyrka S:t Lars
Matt. 20:1-16
Vi måste arbeta mer för mindre lön. Förr kunde vi vänta oss mer, fastän den gemensamma kakan inte växte. Så här har det varit bara i hundra år i vårt land. Det har inte bara varit frågan om lön utan också om rättvisa, att alla har människovärde i sig själv. Människan får inte behandlas hur som helst. Vi kan säkert var och en instämma i det.
Liknelsen om vingårdens ägare handlar egentligen om utbud och efterfrågan. Han har mycket jobb att erbjuda men det finns inte så många som behövde jobb. När det finns lite jobb, kan man bli tvungen att jobba mera för mindre lön. Nu när vingårdsägaren har mycket jobb att erbjuda, kan man få mera lön för mindre jobb.
Jordägaren följer noggrant lagen om utbud och efterfrågan. Det återstår mycket av jobbet ännu när han de sista stunderna man kan anställa arbetskraft. Dem han anställer sist betalar han mest. Han måste få jobbet gjort, därför att hans vingård är stor och kräver mycket arbete. Liknelsen beskriver allt som händer ur arbetsgivarens synvinkel under en arbetsdag. Jesus har ju sagt att tiden är kort och arbetarna få.
Det är tydligt att liknelsen fungerar så här på det konkreta planet. Jesus tar fram berättelsen ur levande livet. Men han gör det team that fields the best players wins. If you tell the bottom ten where they stand, that it’s time to look for something else, that’s considered cruel management.” But, says Welch, it’s far crueler to let people hang on and then get cut later in their careers when they’re less likely to find other work. His ultimate advice to wanna-be managers: “Err on the side of the bold. … Take swings, have fun.”team that fields the best players wins. If you tell the bottom ten where they stand, that it’s time to look for something else, that’s considered cruel management.” But, says Welch, it’s far crueler to let people hang on and then get cut later in their careers when they’re less likely to find other work. His ultimate advice to wanna-be managers: “Err on the side of the bold. … Take swings, have fun.”team that fields the best players wins. If you tell the bottom ten where they stand, that it’s time to look for something else, that’s considered cruel management.” But, says Welch, it’s far crueler to let people hang on and then get cut later in their careers when they’re less likely to find other work. His ultimate advice to wanna-be managers: “Err on the side of the bold. … Take swings, have fun.”other companies) whose corporate culture doesn’t match your own. “No matter how good the numbers look, culture matters as much as financial profile.” He advocates frequent employee evaluations -- he gave his own division heads four reviews a year. “Never give anyone a raise (or stock option or bonus) without a small sheet of paper on how well they did or how they can improve,” says Welch. He admits some of his personnel ideas make When Jack Welch was a young manager, he blew the roof off one of General Electric’s factories in a chemical accident. Summoned to a company VP, Welch received comfort rather than harsh words and a pink slip. This episode proved seminal to Welch’s philosophy and subsequent corporate career, and serves as one of many pithy lessons he offers in a lively conversation at MIT Sloan. “From that day forward, I never berated anybody when they were down,” says Welch. Other lessons learned from his life at GE: Never hire people (or acquire other companies) whose corporate culture doesn’t match your own. “No matter how good the numbers look, culture matters as much as financial profile.” He advocates frequent employee evaluations -- he gave his own division heads four reviews a year. “Never give anyone a raise (or stock option or bonus) without a small sheet of paper on how well they did or how they can improve,” says Welch. He admits some of his personnel ideas make people uncomfortable: in particular, his notion that 10% of employees will never succeed, and should be shown the door as expeditiously as possible. “You’ve got to believe that the team that fields the best players wins. If you tell the bottom ten where they stand, that it’s time to look for something else, that’s considered cruel management.” But, says Welch, it’s far crueler to let people hang on and then get cut later in their careers when they’re less likely to find other work. His ultimate advice to wanna-be managers: “Err on the side of the bold. … Take swings, have fun.”When Jack Welch was a young manager, he blew the roof off one of General Electric’s factories in a chemical accident. Summoned to a company VP, Welch received comfort rather than harsh words and a pink slip. This episode proved seminal to Welch’s philosophy and subsequent corporate career, and serves as one of many pithy lessons he offers in a lively conversation at MIT Sloan. “From that day forward, I never berated anybody when they were down,” says Welch. Other lessons learned from his life at GE: Never hire people (or acquire other companies) whose corporate culture doesn’t match your own. “No matter how good the numbers look, culture matters as much as financial profile.” He advocates frequent employee evaluations -- he gave his own division heads four reviews a year. “Never give anyone a raise (or stock option or bonus) without a small sheet of paper on how well they did or how they can improve,” says Welch. He admits some of his personnel ideas make people uncomfortable: in particular, his notion that 10% of employees will never succeed, and should be shown the door as expeditiously as possible. “You’ve got to believe that the team that fields the best players wins. If you tell the bottom ten where they stand, that it’s time to look for something else, that’s considered cruel management.” But, says Welch, it’s far crueler to let people hang on and then get cut later in their careers when they’re less likely to find other work. His ultimate advice to wanna-be managers: “Err on the side of the bold. … Take swings, have fun.”When Jack Welch was a young manager, he blew the roof off one of General Electric’s factories in a chemical accident. Summoned to a company VP, Welch received comfort rather than harsh words and a pink slip. This episode proved seminal to Welch’s philosophy and subsequent corporate career, and serves as one of many pithy lessons he offers in a lively conversation at MIT Sloan. “From that day forward, I never berated anybody when they were down,” says Welch. Other lessons learned from his life at GE: Never hire people (or acquire other companies) whose corporate culture doesn’t match your own. “No matter how good the numbers look, culture matters as much as financial profile.” He advocates frequent employee evaluations -- he gave his own division heads four reviews a year. “Never give anyone a raise (or stock option or bonus) without a small sheet of paper on how well they did or how they can improve,” says Welch. He admits some of his personnel ideas make people uncomfortable: in particular, his notion that 10% of employees will never succeed, and should be shown the door as expeditiously as possible. “You’ve got to believe that the team that fields the best players wins. If you tell the bottom ten where they stand, that it’s time to look for something else, that’s considered cruel management.” But, says Welch, it’s far crueler to let people hang on and then get cut later in their careers when they’re less likely to find other work. His ultimate advice to wanna-be managers: “Err on the side of the bold. … Take swings, have fun.”When Jack Welch was a young manager, he blew the roof off one of General Electric’s factories in a chemical accident. Summoned to a company VP, Welch received comfort rather than harsh words and a pink slip. This episode proved seminal to Welch’s philosophy and subsequent corporate career, and serves as one of many pithy lessons he offers in a lively conversation at MIT Sloan. “From that day forward, I never berated anybody when they were down,” says Welch. Other lessons learned from his life at GE: Never hire people (or acquire other companies) whose corporate culture doesn’t match your own. “No matter how good the numbers look, culture matters as much as financial profile.” He advocates frequent employee evaluations -- he gave his own division heads four reviews a year. “Never give anyone a raise (or stock option or bonus) without a small sheet of paper on how well they did or how they can improve,” says Welch. He admits some of his personnel ideas make people uncomfortable: in particular, his notion that 10% of employees will never succeed, and should be shown the door as expeditiously as possible. “You’ve got to believe that the team that fields the best players wins. If you tell the bottom ten where they stand, that it’s time to look for something else, that’s considered cruel management.” But, says Welch, it’s far crueler to let people hang on and then get cut later in their careers when they’re less likely to find other work. His ultimate advice to wanna-be managers: “Err on the side of the bold. … Take swings, have fun.”When Jack Welch was a young manager, he blew the roof off one of General Electric’s factories in a chemical accident. Summoned to a company VP, Welch received comfort rather than harsh words and a pink slip. This episode proved seminal to Welch’s philosophy and subsequent corporate career, and serves as one of many pithy lessons he offers in a lively conversation at MIT Sloan. “From that day forward, I never berated anybody when they were down,” says Welch. Other lessons learned from his life at GE: Never hire people (or acquire other companies) whose corporate culture doesn’t match your own. “No matter how good the numbers look, culture matters as much as financial profile.” He advocates frequent employee evaluations -- he gave his own division heads four reviews a year. “Never give anyone a raise (or stock option or bonus) without a small sheet of paper on how well they did or how they can improve,” says Welch. He admits some of his personnel ideas make people uncomfortable: in particular, his notion that 10% of employees will never succeed, and should be shown the door as expeditiously as possible. “You’ve got to believe that the team that fields the best players wins. If you tell the bottom ten where they stand, that it’s time to look for something else, that’s considered cruel management.” But, says Welch, it’s far crueler to let people hang on and then get cut later in their careers when they’re less likely to find other work. His ultimate advice to wanna-be managers: “Err on the side of the bold. … Take swings, have fun.”When Jack Welch was a young manager, he blew the roof off one of General Electric’s factories in a chemical accident. Summoned to a company VP, Welch received comfort rather than harsh words and a pink slip. This episode proved seminal to Welch’s philosophy and subsequent corporate career, and serves as one of many pithy lessons he offers in a lively conversation at MIT Sloan. “From that day forward, I never berated anybody when they were down,” says Welch. Other lessons learned from his life at GE: Never hire people (or acquire other companies) whose corporate culture doesn’t match your own. “No matter how good the numbers look, culture matters as much as financial profile.” He advocates frequent employee evaluations -- he gave his own division heads four reviews a year. “Never give anyone a raise (or stock option or bonus) without a small sheet of paper on how well they did or how they can improve,” says Welch. He admits some of his personnel ideas make people uncomfortable: in particular, his notion that 10% of employees will never succeed, and should be shown the door as expeditiously as possible. “You’ve got to believe that the team that fields the best players wins. If you tell the bottom ten where they stand, that it’s time to look for something else, that’s considered cruel management.” But, says Welch, it’s far crueler to let people hang on and then get cut later in their careers when they’re less likely to find other work. His ultimate advice to wanna-be managers: “Err on the side of the bold. … Take swings, have fun.”When Jack Welch was a young manager, he blew the roof off one of General Electric’s factories in a chemical accident. Summoned to a company VP, Welch received comfort rather than harsh words and a pink slip. This episode proved seminal to Welch’s philosophy and subsequent corporate career, and serves as one of many pithy lessons he offers in a lively conversation at MIT Sloan. “From that day forward, I never berated anybody when they were down,” says Welch. Other lessons learned from his life at GE: Never hire people (or acquire other companies) whose corporate culture doesn’t match your own. “No matter how good the numbers look, culture matters as much as financial profile.” He advocates frequent employee evaluations -- he gave his own division heads four reviews a year. “Never give anyone a raise (or stock option or bonus) without a small sheet of paper on how well they did or how they can improve,” says Welch. He admits some of his personnel ideas make people uncomfortable: in particular, his notion that 10% of employees will never succeed, and should be shown the door as expeditiously as possible. “You’ve got to believe that the team that fields the best players wins. If you tell the bottom ten where they stand, that it’s time to look for something else, that’s considered cruel management.” But, says Welch, it’s far crueler to let people hang on and then get cut later in their careers when they’re less likely to find other work. His ultimate advice to wanna-be managers: “Err on the side of the bold. … Take swings, have fun.”When Jack Welch was a young manager, he blew the roof off one of General Electric’s factories in a chemical accident. Summoned to a company VP, Welch received comfort rather than harsh words and a pink slip. This episode proved seminal to Welch’s philosophy and subsequent corporate career, and serves as one of many pithy lessons he offers in a lively conversation at MIT Sloan. “From that day forward, I never berated anybody when they were down,” says Welch. Other lessons learned from his life at GE: Never hire people (or acquire other companies) whose corporate culture doesn’t match your own. “No matter how good the numbers look, culture matters as much as financial profile.” He advocates frequent employee evaluations -- he gave his own division heads four reviews a year. “Never give anyone a raise (or stock option or bonus) without a small sheet of paper on how well they did or how they can improve,” says Welch. He admits some of his personnel ideas make people uncomfortable: in particular, his notion that 10% of employees will never succeed, and should be shown the door as expeditiously as possible. “You’ve got to believe that the team that fields the best players wins. If you tell the bottom ten where they stand, that it’s time to look for something else, that’s considered cruel management.” But, says Welch, it’s far crueler to let people hang on and then get cut later in their careers when they’re less likely to find other work. His ultimate advice to wanna-be managers: “Err on the side of the bold. … Take swings, have fun.”When Jack Welch was a young manager, he blew the roof off one of General Electric’s factories in a chemical accident. Summoned to a company VP, Welch received comfort rather than harsh words and a pink slip. This episode proved seminal to Welch’s philosophy and subsequent corporate career, and serves as one of many pithy lessons he offers in a lively conversation at MIT Sloan. “From that day forward, I never berated anybody when they were down,” says Welch. Other lessons learned from his life at GE: Never hire people (or acquire other companies) whose corporate culture doesn’t match your own. “No matter how good the numbers look, culture matters as much as financial profile.” He advocates frequent employee evaluations -- he gave his own division heads four reviews a year. “Never give anyone a raise (or stock option or bonus) without a small sheet of paper on how well they did or how they can improve,” says Welch. He admits some of his personnel ideas make people uncomfortable: in particular, his notion that 10% of employees will never succeed, and should be shown the door as expeditiously as possible. “You’ve got to believe that the team that fields the best players wins. If you tell the bottom ten where they stand, that it’s time to look for something else, that’s considered cruel management.” But, says Welch, it’s far crueler to let people hang on and then get cut later in their careers when they’re less likely to find other work. His ultimate advice to wanna-be managers: “Err on the side of the bold. … Take swings, have fun.”When Jack Welch was a young manager, he blew the roof off one of General Electric’s factories in a chemical accident. Summoned to a company VP, Welch received comfort rather than harsh words and a pink slip. This episode proved seminal to Welch’s philosophy and subsequent corporate career, and serves as one of many pithy lessons he offers in a lively conversation at MIT Sloan. “From that day forward, I never berated anybody when they were down,” says Welch. Other lessons learned from his life at GE: Never hire people (or acquire other companies) whose corporate culture doesn’t match your own. “No matter how good the numbers look, culture matters as much as financial profile.” He advocates frequent employee evaluations -- he gave his own division heads four reviews a year. “Never give anyone a raise (or stock option or bonus) without a small sheet of paper on how well they did or how they can improve,” says Welch. He admits some of his personnel ideas make people uncomfortable: in particular, his notion that 10% of employees will never succeed, and should be shown the door as expeditiously as possible. “You’ve got to believe that the team that fields the best players wins. If you tell the bottom ten where they stand, that it’s time to look for something else, that’s considered cruel management.” But, says Welch, it’s far crueler to let people hang on and then get cut later in their careers when they’re less likely to find other work. His ultimate advice to wanna-be managers: “Err on the side of the bold. … Take swings, have fun.”When Jack Welch was a young manager, he blew the roof off one of General Electric’s factories in a chemical accident. Summoned to a company VP, Welch received comfort rather than harsh words and a pink slip. This episode proved seminal to Welch’s philosophy and subsequent corporate career, and serves as one of many pithy lessons he offers in a lively conversation at MIT Sloan. “From that day forward, I never berated anybody when they were down,” says Welch. Other lessons learned from his life at GE: Never hire people (or acquire other companies) whose corporate culture doesn’t match your own. “No matter how good the numbers look, culture matters as much as financial profile.” He advocates frequent employee evaluations -- he gave his own division heads four reviews a year. “Never give anyone a raise (or stock option or bonus) without a small sheet of paper on how well they did or how they can improve,” says Welch. He admits some of his personnel ideas make people uncomfortable: in particular, his notion that 10% of employees will never succeed, and should be shown the door as expeditiously as possible. “You’ve got to believe that the team that fields the best players wins. If you tell the bottom ten where they stand, that it’s time to look for something else, that’s considered cruel management.” But, says Welch, it’s far crueler to let people hang on and then get cut later in their careers when they’re less likely to find other work. His ultimate advice to wanna-be managers: “Err on the side of the bold. … Take swings, have fun.”som ett svar på lärjungarnas rädsla. De var rädda att gå miste om den himmelska lönen som Jesus hade lovat dem. Han hade lovat att de skall få hundra gånger tillbaka för den egendom som de lämnat efter sig och evigt liv.
Flera av lärjungarna hade ju varit fiskare. De hade haft ganska god lön, eftersom det fanns en stor efterfrågan på deras produkter p.g.a. befolkningsökningen runt Tiberias sjö. Nu hade lärjungarna slagit följe med en predikant som vid den här tidpunkten såg ut att gå ett ganska dystert öde tillmötes. Därför hade de blivit oroliga för att gå miste om den stora lönen, fastän de måste vänta länge. De väntade därför att de trodde på vad Jesus lovade.
Jag har någon gång tidigare förklarat varför lärjungarna tog emot Jesu erbjudande så ivrigt fastän de hade bra jobb. Jesus hade lovat dem något som de tänkte att de inte hade någon chans att få. De förstod att de fått erbjudandet av Gud själv, som på ett märkligt sätt hade blivit alldeles verklig för dem. De är från den stunden helt inställda på framtiden och på Guds rike.
Liknelsen om vingårdsarbetarnas lön fungerar sedan också på ett annat plan. För att lugna lärjungarna förklarar Jesus hurudan Gud är. Vi unnar lärjungarna säkert allt Jesus lovat dem mer än gärna. De var pionjärer i jobbet och deras position kan man inte avundas. De gjorde jobbet väl och vi följer dem gärna i fotspåren. Det kommer hela tiden fler som vill jobba för samma rike, en efter en. Gud lovar alla lärjungar i alla tider samma stora obegripliga lön.
Det här grundar sig på en annan lag än om den om utbud och efterfrågan. Den grundar sig framför allt på att han kallar oss alla till sig, eftersom han skapat alla. Det har varit hans syfte från början. Därför lät han Jesus kalla honom Fader för att visa hur nära han är.
Jesus lär idag att Gud är nådig. Ordet är mycket lätt att förstå. Det betyder att Gud är god och att vi inte behöver förtjäna hans godhet. Han är god mot oss alla utan vår förtjänst och han ger oss den obeskrivligt stora gåvan gratis.
Guds gåva är förlåtelse och evigt liv. Förlåtelsen betyder att han raderar vår skuld och glömmer den. När han ger oss det eviga livet så ger han oss något som vi inte på något sätt kan förstå och inte förtjäna.
Gud räknar inte på vad det kostar att få oss till sig, för att han älskar oss. Den som älskar räknar varken på besvär eller kostnader. Och sist men inte minst, allt det här har vi redan fått och det har han redan visat för oss. Han vet att gärningar talar högre än ord.

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